More about P-values: what are the alternatives?

I earlier mentioned that a high-ranking journal in Psychology called “Basic and Applied Social Psychology” has banned the use of P-values. Today, I came across some additional material on this question. First of all, the controversial editorial where the decision was announced.

A paper, published in this journal, giving guidelines on the best way of presenting results without use of P-values. The paper by Geoff Cumming, titled “The New Statistics: Why and How” makes a good argument for using confidence intervals and other descriptive statistics in place of P-values.

He also has a series of videos in YouTube from which the three linked to below are related to the use (and misuse) of P-values. For my liking he does not make a clear enough distinction between the problem inherent to P-values (that they discard a lot of information to reach a true/false decision) and those problems due to the misuse and misinterpretation of tests of significance. He does mention the difference, but you need to keep your eyes and ears open to get this out of his presentations.

In addition a blog and podcast of a round table complete the discussion of this issue giving a bit wider account of the controversy surrounding the use of P-value.

 

How to be a modern scientist by Jeffrey Leek [Leanpub]

A book on how to be a scientist the modern way.

Source: How to be a modern… by Jeffrey Leek [Leanpub PDF/iPad/Kindle]

Book cover image

This book looks very useful for PhD students and also to some extent for more experienced researchers willing to get up-to-speed with the use of modern communication tools and on-line media and forums.

It covers a lot of subjects concisely and is very up-to-date. It is an easy read but full of useful information and ideas.

The e-book has a suggested price, but you can chose to get it for free or pay less if you are on a tight budget. Payment is fully voluntary, so you can also pay more than the suggested price if you want to support the author.